The Living Wiccan
Day in the life. Preparing quite a few satchets! Crafty crafty.

Day in the life. Preparing quite a few satchets! Crafty crafty.

The Living Wiccan’s “Hell Hath No Fury” Protection Powder

This is a very simple protection salt I use to ring around my rituals, cleanse my spaces, and even sweep the floor with.

It’s good because not only does it protect, but gives a nice bite back to any negativity/entity/thing that tries to cross it. Best for ritual work and simple spirit work, not necessarily protection from physical attackers.

It’s something pretty much every single one of my readers can make at home with its ridiculously simple ingredients and process, but it’s not something that everyone would think of off the top of their head.

Ready? Here we go. Try not to sneeze!

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Made rebloggable by request. 
)O(TheLivingWiccan

Made rebloggable by request. 

)O(
TheLivingWiccan

TheLivingWiccan’s Totally Non-Witchcraft Related Recipe: Iced Mint

Hello there! I’m going to share a little recipe I’ve had since forever.

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Backstory. This recipe started out as a little summer experiment: my garden has an abundance of mint growing absolutely wild. It grows 10 times faster than I can harvest it. Naturally, I wanted to figure out other ways to use it before the season ended, and this was for two reasons:

  1. I couldn’t just let all this mint in my garden go to waste.
  2. If I did, it would surely overrun my other plants and ruin my aconite harvest.

So what did I do? I pulled out an entire plant stalk and shoved it in a blender. 

Here’s how you make this delicious and refreshing drink:

  • ice (about 1 +1/2 cups per drink)
  • mint (lots and lots — enough to turn the drink green when blended. We’re talking an entire plant, here. About 15-20 big leaves per drink)
  • lemon juice (preferably from a real lemon, but the bottled stuff works too — about a half a lemon per drink)
  • sugar or other sweetener (add for your own taste!)

Blend them together and you have a wonderful, icy green drink.

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Of course, even food and drink can be used for witchcraft if you really put your mint mind to it. Some properties of mint:

  • protection
  • prosperity
  • money
  • luck
  • travel
  • Venus
  • Mercury
  • Mars (peppermint)
  • exorcism  
  • lust
  • healing
  • love
  • psychism
  • purification
  • clairvoyance

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And — if you’ve got something else on your mind other than witchcraft — this drink goes absolutely lovely with a shot of vodka or gin.

Happy Summer drinking!

**This recipe property of TheLivingWiccan — do not remove source!**

Interfaith During the Season of Festivity

I hope everyone’s weekends were pleasant and filled with Solstice festivities, no matter how you celebrated them. Between the full moon and the solstice, I was finding it hard to finish all the witchcraft I wanted to!

For myself, this weekend was a bit of an amalgamation of interfaith worship, altar and ritual wok, discovery of Deity, supply shopping (new mortar and pestle? Fantastic), and all-around reconnecting.

A little known fact about me is that I sometimes sing in a Christian choir: Anglican, to be exact, as a favour to my family — and to myself. I find singing to be one of my many outlets of worship, and interfaith was a big part of my discovery down my own path, so I like to revisit it whenever I can, with as many religions as I can, and even with secular practices. This weekend, it happened to be Christianity. 

The reason I’m writing all of this is because this weekend, I found special reason to pay attention to a particular motet during Evensong:

Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and the spirit of God dwelleth within you: for the temple of God is holy, which temple are ye: for the love of whom ye do this day celebrate the joys of the temple with a season of festivity. O how dreadful is this place. This is the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.

Tabernacle: a dwelling place, a residence, a home. Think about that: the tabernacle, the dwelling place of the All is within us. Which temple are ye? I prefer to phrase that part of the motet in the form of a question. Which temple? In what way do you choose to honour Deity? For the love of whom you do this day celebrate the joys of the temple with a season of festivity.

Today, we celebrate the joy of the temple, the joy within ourselves, for the love of whosoever resides within that temple: whether it is Allah, Christ, Yahweh, Diana, Buddha, Hecate, Odin, Satan, The Triple Goddess, Cernunnos, or simply yourself, unpartnered with Deity. This day, the present, the current course of our lives, we spend our festivities celebrating that which dwells within us, Deity or not.

O how dreadful is this place. Literally: full of dread, full of fear. When we hear talk of being God-Fearing, I often feel as though it’s a little deeper than blind fear, fear of Hell, of purgatory, of punishment, of unfulfillment. I believe that it goes past that.

The sermons on Sunday were about Elijah’s journey to save his own life, as Ahab had ordered the prophets of Christ murdered to make room for the 450 prophets of Ba’al (Kings 18).

I don’t know if my readers know much about Ba’al, but it’s a Northwest Semitic title referring to various Gods, used when only priests could utter the Deity’s holy name (hence why I use Ba’al here). In this context, the reading referred to Ba’al of Tyre, the God of lightning, thunder, and rain, and the priests of Ba’al who confront Elijah.

I can only imagine the fear in Elijah`s heart, running from his death by the lightning of Ba’al and His priests; the dread that must have wrapped his heart. O how dreadful is this place. If “this place” is Elijah, if the tabernacle of God really is with men, then in his fear, Elijah himself becomes that tabernacle. He becomes the Temple of Yahweh.

And here’s where the interfaith comes in. At what point do we start seeing the Cult of Ba’al as their own separate tabernacle of God? In which aspect does the All manifest in these priests who confront Elijah? Are they not their own Temple for Deity?

So in the end, we come back to the question: which temple are ye? In what way do we celebrate the All personified by us? In the end, are we the prophets of Ba’al, who render Ahab furious and murderous, or are we Elijah, only wishing to live in peace and in his love for Yahweh, celebrating the joy with a season of festivities? Or will we find the stories mixed? And, in the end, will we ever know?

Just some food for thought. Today I refresh the offerings on the altar, I pray, I relax, I live, I breathe. Amen.

Eventually you’ll start noticing patterns. You’ll start seeing things in the picture that you didn’t notice before. You’ll say “Well, hm… the book says that this card means love. And they don’t mention it, but I think this rosebush in the back might imply that it’s bitersweet — I see thorns.” When you start making your own connections, that’s when you’re on a roll. Cartomancy and the images of cartomancy tap into the subconscious via universal archetypes. Once you start seeing it, you’ll start making stories out of any old pictures people throw at you.

At that point, once you know the “official” meanings, and you’ve “created” your own to go along with it, you just have to go with your intuition.


The Living Wiccan

http://thelivingwiccan.tumblr.com/post/41409740732/do-you-have-any-advice-for-using-tarot-cards

(via lyblac)

Aw, a quote from me? Thanks, guys!

Determination Powder

Today I’m sharing a recipe I use to make a powder for determination. This can be used in spells, charms, bottles, and sprinkled on a person for determination.

WARNING: This powder should never, ever be ingested, burned, or made into a salve due to the toxicity of its ingredients.

What you’ll need:

  • 3-5 days prep time (finding the ingredients, drying them, etc)
  • 1 full moon (each day of it)
  • 1 mortar and pestle
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 1 candle (colour arbitrary)
  • The stamens of  125 snapdragon flowers (Plantaginaceae, genus Antirrhinum)
  • 10 whole orchids (Orchidaceae - pictured here: genus Phalaenopsis)
  • 5 calla lily bells/spathes (Zantedeschia aethiopica)

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I’ve adapted this recipe to make a fairly large batch, but should you need smaller or larger amounts, keep the ratios the same. For example, in a recipe with only 2 orchids,  you’ll need 1 calla lily and 24 snapdragons.

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Here’s what 125 snapdragons look like:

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First, a few days before the full moon, start drying the ingredients. It’s easiest for the calla lilies to dry when they’re cut into small pieces. You want to cut down to the point where the colours of the bell/spathe start to fade. For those of you using white calla lilies, that’s about the point where the inflorescence (the inside part of the flower) ends. You should also start drying the orchids at this time.

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Next, harvest the ingredients. During the height of the full moon, collect the stamens of the snapdragons by candlelight.

To collect the stamens of the snapdragon flowers, it’s easiest when the flowers have been drying for a day or two but still have some moisture retained (this is why we begin to dry them 1-2 days before the full moon begins).

For those who don’t know much about plant anatomy, the stamens are the little miniature stem-looking parts of the flower, located inside. They’re very tiny. You’ll have to tear the petals off, or at least in half, to get inside. You want to collect the stamens, but not the ovaries. Each snapdragon only has 1 ovary, but 4-5 stamens. It’s easy to distinguish between the two: the ovaries are a light to dark green colour, whereas the stamens are white (see the difference in the picture below)

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Then, wait until all ingredients are dried.
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On the last night of the full moon, grind up the stamens, the calla lily bells/spathes and the orchids. Use as a powder.

I hope this recipe serves you as well as it has served me!

TheLivingWiccan

**All words and photos are property of TheLivingWiccan. Feel free to share recipe WITH CREDIT. Do not remove source**

EDIT: If you’re going to reblog this, please keep the text.That’s kind of the point of the whole picture.
Hello there! I’ve been getting a lot of questions like these recently, and I feel it’s best to just address them all at once.
First of all, let’s start with the basics.
Wicca — along with some (some!) other modern Pagan religions — follow a cycle that embodies the wheel of the year. Most commonly there are 4 major holidays, or Sababts, that correspond with the cross-quarter days (that is, the days that are in between each solstice and each equinox (2 of each)), and 4 quarter days that fall on the solstices and equinoxes. 
Let’s start with the cross-quarter days. These holidays, Sabbats,  include:
Imbolc/Imbolg/Candlemas — 1st or 2nd of February.
Beltane/Beltaine/Beltine/Bealtaine/Bealltainn/Boaltinn/Boaldyn (so many names!) — May 1st. The astrological date for Beltane is actually closer to the 5th or 6th or 7th, but this can vary from year to year and most people like to rely on tradition.
Lammas/Lughnasadh/Calan Awst— August 1st
Samhain — October 31st through till November 1st
The reason the names are so different is because of the different traditions of the British, Welsh, Irish, etc.
Now for the 4 quarter Sababts, or rather, the days that correspond with the 2 solstices and the 2 equinoxes. In British and Irish tradition, these were also the days each year on which servants were hired, and rents were due (Wikipedia).
These are:
Yule — December 21st
Ostara — March 21st
Litha — June 21st
Mabon — September 21st
Of course, these dates change nearly every year. Because the calendar isn’t exactly 365 days each year (more like 364.8 or something crazy like that), the dates of the equinoxes shift from anywhere from half a day to 2 days. On any given year, Litha could be on the 19th June, the 20th June, the 21st June, or even the 22nd June.
This, in turn, changes the astrological times and dates of the midpoints — or rather, the cross-quarter days: Imbolc, Beltane, Lammas, and Samhain. However, most modern Pagans don’t bother with the date changes (most, not all!) and prefer to stick to traditional dates.
As for the Esbats:
Esbats are days of service performed by Wiccans. Every full moon, as stated in the Rede, Wiccans are supposed to meet by the light of the full moon and perform ritual. Esbats are used to reconnect with the Goddess, and to give thanks and place offerings, to dance and sing, and appreciate all that the Goddess gives to them.
I really hope this has helped. It’s a pretty general overview, and of course doesn’t nearly go into detail of the Sabbats and Esbats themselves. Here are some links from my Answered Questions Page„ in the Ritual/Sabbat/Esbat specific page. You should always keep looking at the Answered Questions page, because it gets updated nearly every single week.
)O( TheLivingWiccan
Why do you celebrate Lunar and Solar dates?
What is Yule and how can I celebrate it?
Even more about Yule
Even even more about Yule
What if I don’t want to do a Yule ritual?
What are some good Yule gifts?In Preparation for Samhain 2011
All About Imbolc
The Story of Imbolc
Milk Magic for Imbolc
Correspondences for Imbolc
Low-Cost Ideas for Imbolc
All About Lupercalia
All About Ostara

EDIT: If you’re going to reblog this, please keep the text.
That’s kind of the point of the whole picture.

Hello there! I’ve been getting a lot of questions like these recently, and I feel it’s best to just address them all at once.

First of all, let’s start with the basics.

Wicca — along with some (some!) other modern Pagan religions — follow a cycle that embodies the wheel of the year. Most commonly there are 4 major holidays, or Sababts, that correspond with the cross-quarter days (that is, the days that are in between each solstice and each equinox (2 of each)), and 4 quarter days that fall on the solstices and equinoxes. 

Let’s start with the cross-quarter days. These holidays, Sabbats,  include:

  • Imbolc/Imbolg/Candlemas — 1st or 2nd of February.
  • Beltane/Beltaine/Beltine/Bealtaine/Bealltainn/Boaltinn/Boaldyn (so many names!) — May 1st. The astrological date for Beltane is actually closer to the 5th or 6th or 7th, but this can vary from year to year and most people like to rely on tradition.
  • Lammas/Lughnasadh/Calan Awst— August 1st
  • Samhain — October 31st through till November 1st

The reason the names are so different is because of the different traditions of the British, Welsh, Irish, etc.

Now for the 4 quarter Sababts, or rather, the days that correspond with the 2 solstices and the 2 equinoxes. In British and Irish tradition, these were also the days each year on which servants were hired, and rents were due (Wikipedia).

These are:

  • Yule — December 21st
  • Ostara — March 21st
  • Litha — June 21st
  • Mabon — September 21st

Of course, these dates change nearly every year. Because the calendar isn’t exactly 365 days each year (more like 364.8 or something crazy like that), the dates of the equinoxes shift from anywhere from half a day to 2 days. On any given year, Litha could be on the 19th June, the 20th June, the 21st June, or even the 22nd June.

This, in turn, changes the astrological times and dates of the midpoints — or rather, the cross-quarter days: Imbolc, Beltane, Lammas, and Samhain. However, most modern Pagans don’t bother with the date changes (most, not all!) and prefer to stick to traditional dates.

As for the Esbats:

Esbats are days of service performed by Wiccans. Every full moon, as stated in the Rede, Wiccans are supposed to meet by the light of the full moon and perform ritual. Esbats are used to reconnect with the Goddess, and to give thanks and place offerings, to dance and sing, and appreciate all that the Goddess gives to them.

I really hope this has helped. It’s a pretty general overview, and of course doesn’t nearly go into detail of the Sabbats and Esbats themselves. Here are some links from my Answered Questions Page„ in the Ritual/Sabbat/Esbat specific page. You should always keep looking at the Answered Questions page, because it gets updated nearly every single week.

)O(
TheLivingWiccan

Why do you celebrate Lunar and Solar dates?

What is Yule and how can I celebrate it?

Even more about Yule

Even even more about Yule

What if I don’t want to do a Yule ritual?

What are some good Yule gifts?

In Preparation for Samhain 2011

All About Imbolc

The Story of Imbolc

Milk Magic for Imbolc

Correspondences for Imbolc

Low-Cost Ideas for Imbolc

All About Lupercalia

All About Ostara

Tonight:

Went down to my favorite herbal dispensary and restocked my licorice root and willow bark stock.

There’s something so wonderful about those two herbs. You always know that you’ll

  • have herbs for a cup of delicious tea
  • have herbs to ease pain

I think that right there is magical.

Question Answering Day! Friday, October 17th, 2012

In anticipation for this year’s Samhain, I will be answering your questions next week. Anything you can think of, simple or complicated, subtle or deep, common or controversial, I will be happy to answer. So send them in!

TheLivingWiccan

So this is a newly crafted outdoor altar I’ve managed to erect (somehow, with all this harvesting taking up my time). This isn’t a new thing for me, but I figured that my followers would’ve like to see this one as it evolves.

So it’s just a slab of stone on a trunk, and on it I’ve placed perovskia, yarrow, a rose, four tomatoes, four rosehips, and a carnelian crystal. I left them out in the light of the waxing moon to dedicate it.

All photos property of TheLivingWiccan. Do not remove source!

So this is a fairly old altar that I stumbled across pictures from. These photos were taken approximately just after Beltane, before the harvest festivals started… Which is a long time, especially in terms of how often I rearrange my altars.

So what you’re looking are two general set-ups, just the basic altars that I change around every once and a while.  Let’s start with the main one under the window with the leafy altar cloth, just the things under the table. We’ve got the pentagram hanging candle holder, chalices, antlers (almost always present to represent the Great Consort) and plenty of red candles. We also have little personal items, such as the angel that a dear friend gave to me.

As for the large area around it: this is a space that has been cultivated by me for years now. This is at my main home, the one I spend the most time at, and therefore is much larger than some of my other locations. The writing above the window is my own, though the words are not. Many of you may recognise it from Romeo and Juliet, Act II Scene ii. A complicated branch is suspended above the altar, and a Sabbat satchet that a very dear friend made for me hangs from it, as well. The furs are the head of a coyote and the tail of a racoon, symbolizing the beginning and end of all things. In the center hangs a protection strand of dried beans. On the sides are a mask that my mother gave to me, and an evil eye which my brother gave to me. You can see on either side my shelves of general witchery: necklaces, candles, a wonderful decorative box that was gifted to me by another dear friend, mortar and pestles, etc.

I think this is the first photoset where you have been able to see my entire altar space; which is surprising I could even take a photo, as it is quite large. However, it has changed since this photo was taken.

The second last photo in this photoset is of my seperate altar. (I have three in my room at the moment: One for general ritual, one to honour a specific Deity, theme, or goal that I’m focusing on at the moment, and a third for Honouring the Glorious Dead: I find that this one comes almost accidentally — many people mistakenly think that they should gift me dead animals. As much as I appreciate the sentiment, I often feel as though they should be honoured properly.)

So the second last photo was my Goddess altar. On it you’ll recognise the two statues I often use, my dragon candle holder (yes, it is hollow, has scale-shaped holes, and has candle holders inside), rabbit fur with roses placed on top, my second mortar and pestle, with a flourite crystal and more roses.

The very last photo is something I do a lot with my altars, especially my God altars. I found three of these claw-like carvings with horned men carved into them (one can only assume that they were supposed to be the Devil). I use them sort of as a calendar, to mark when the Great One is in His youth, manhood, or wise age. By the looks of this photo, I can assume that we were somewhere between Beltane and Lughnasadh.

Well, that was an awful lot of writing. I hope you all enjoy some more insight into my Craft, my practices, whathaveyou. Blessed Be.

All photos are property of TheLivingWiccan: Do not remove source.

A picture I took a while when I was in the big city for a little while, one of my two homes — drying herbs; urban witchery.
Photo property of TheLivingWiccan. Do not remove source.

A picture I took a while when I was in the big city for a little while, one of my two homes — drying herbs; urban witchery.

Photo property of TheLivingWiccan. Do not remove source.

More and more I’ve been getting requests for my own personal rituals and altars. So what you’re looking at now is my altar which is honouring Cernunnos and Aphrodite tonight.  The incense is sandalwood.

On the left, we have flowers to Cernunnos: Feather Reed Grass and black eyed Susans tied into a gourd leaf from my garden, symbolizing the coming harvest. Also present are antlers.

On the right, we have flowers to Aphrodite: Butterfly bush, perovskia, and various colours of roses wrapped with a red ribbon. Also present is a shell and a jade bear (whose symbolism is personal, and doesn’t really matter in this context. But you need to expand the photo to see the whole thing).

On both sides of the altar, for each Deity, we have a chalice filled with white Australian Reisling, and a candle from my God and Goddess altar (you may recognize the green one from my previous altar post).

In the centre is my offering bowl filled with oregano, summer savoury and tomatoes. All the offerings are from my garden, flowers and all. The last picture you see is my offering bowl (which I adore) when it’s empty.

All photos property of TheLivingWiccan. Do not remove source.

2000 followers?!?

I logged on today to see that I had 2005 followers.

Just, wow. Wasn’t it only a week or two ago when I had 1500? It seems like only yesterday that I started this blog. I thank you all so much for the support you constantly send me and the great questions that you’ve sent in — not only does it help me fulfill my goal of helping people out on this journey of theirs, but it also helps others who may have the same questions as you!

In short, thank you. I hope to see you guys around for the next long while to come.

Blessed Be,

TheLivingWiccan

)O(